Question

Is “Black Friday” a good term to get people thinking or picturing a lot of people shopping?

 

 

 

 

In the US this gesture means “OK”, which is a positive reference. Is it OK for me to use this gesture?

Ok Symbol.jpg

 

I need a gibberish language to demonstrate machine learning and Nadsat from Clockwork Orange comes to mind. Is that OK?

 

 

 


I’m using a several cityscapes as a backdrop to my presentation. Any issues with this one?

City.jpg

Answer

No, because it’s not inclusive or globally ready! Black Friday is a US reference to the Friday following Thanksgiving, which is a US holiday. We usually recommend the most agnostic approach as possible when describing concepts. And it brings up a larger discussion. In this example, the reference to black is to describe profit and red to describe losses. That’s not the same globally either. Use of color must respect a wide variety of associations and meanings.
 

No. It might surprise you to know that this gesture has insulting and scatological connotations in many Latin American countries. It means zero or worthless in France, while it means money in Japan. It is also used to symbolize white power.
 

 

 

No, no, and no. Firstly, the material belongs to Anthony Burgess, author of the novel, “A Clockwork Orange”. Secondly, licensing and lexicon notwithstanding, this story depicts several topics that many users would find disturbing, including violence, inappropriate language, and crime. And really, they’re not likely germane to any communication. Lastly, no form of gibberish translates into other global languages.


Global readiness is absolutely tied to current events. So our advice, given a recent violent episode in Las Vegas, is to pick another cityscape for use.